Calling all non-residents! Your ITIN may be expiring

IRS recently announced that the Individual Taxpayer Identification Numbers (ITIN) will need to be renewed every 3 years. The new release states that the ITIN is temporary and cannot be permanently used. In order to renew the ITIN, non-residents will need to file a new application on Form W-7 after 3 years, otherwise their tax returns will be rejected.

The IRS announced changes which require certain taxpayers to renew their ITINs. The renewal of ITINs requirement does not apply to ITIN holders who do not need to file their tax returns in 2017.

The following taxpayers require renewal of ITINs:

  • Taxpayers with ITINs not used on federal tax returns for at least once in last 3 years i.e. 2013, 2014 and 2015. Such unused ITINs will require renewal and will not be valid for filing tax returns in 2017.
  •  Taxpayers who were issued ITINs prior to 2013. Their ITINs will begin expiring this year and the taxpayer must renew them to prevent rejection of their tax returns.

IRS further states that Taxpayers will need to renew their ITINs on a rolling basis which means that the first ITINs that will expire are the ones with middle digits of 78 or 79 and the ones that are not used for one of the 3 prior years. These ITINs will need to be renewed with the period beginning October 1, 2016.

The taxpayer who has an expired ITIN and who does not renew it before filing the tax returns in 2017, may have a delay in refund and may be ineligible for certain tax credit like American Opportunity tax credit and child tax credit till the time new ITIN is not received.

Taxpayers should check their ITINs as soon as possible. Taxpayers with an ITIN with middle digits of 78 or 79 can apply for ITINs for the entire family at the same time. Family members include taxpayer, spouse and dependents claimed on their tax returns.

Other important changes for dependents of taxpayers:

Following are the new requirements for dependents whose passport do not have the date of entry in the U.S.:

  1. The IRS will not accept passport as stand-alone identity document if the passport does not have the date of entry in the US for dependents from countries other than Canada and Mexico or dependents of military members overseas.
  2. All such applicants who do not have a date of entry in the US on their passports will now be required to submit medical records for dependents under the age of 6 or U.S. school records for dependent under the age of 18 along with the passport.

All dependents aged 18 years or above can submit the rental or bank statement or utility bill having full name of the applicant and US address along with the passport.

CPA Global Tax & Accounting is an IRS approved Certifying Acceptance Agent. Generally, taxpayers are required to send their original passports and/ or other original documents, however, we can certify these documents, ensure that the Form W-7 is correctly prepared and submit them to IRS.

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IRS planning more enforcements for NRA athletes, entertainers and foreign government employees

Nonresident alien (NRA) athletes and entertainers performing independent personal services or participating in the U.S. and embassy and consulate employees in the U.S. can expect more enforcement and litigation, an IRS official said May 12.

Speaking at the American Bar Association Tax Section meeting in Washington, Lindsey D. Stellwagen, Special Counsel International, Office of Chief Counsel said that although there had been a lot of publicity on IRS measures to enforce compliance on U.S. persons  with offshore wealth, her agency is also stepping up enforcement of NRAs and resident aliens (e.g. green card holders) that owe U.S. tax. She discussed the IRS programs pertaining to athletes and entertainers and the embassy project.

Foreign athletes and entertainers may pose a challenge to IRS enforcement because they come into the U.S. for a brief period of time, earn a lot of money, then leave. Such persons may be able to evade paying tax on  their U.S.-source income and enforcement may be futile if they money earned has exited the U.S. without the imposition of withholding at source.

Nonresident alien entertainers or athletes performing independent personal services or participating in athletic events in the U.S. are generally subject to a 30 percent withholding on gross income. Stellwagen explained that under the central withholding  agreement (CWA) program, such persons may be subject to reduced withholding provided that certain requirements are satisfied. The agreement is entered into by the NRA athlete or entertainer, a withholding agent and the IRS and is valid for a specific tour  or series of events. Withholding is based upon the budget provided and estimated net profits.

CPA Global Tax & Accounting PLLC can assist athletes and entertainers with the CWA program and work with the IRS to minimize the exposures.