GILTI? IRS issues proposed regulations

Section 951A, which was added by the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) enacted in December, 2017, subjects a current US tax on a U.S. shareholder’s pro rata share of its global intangible low tax income (GILTI).

Under the TCJA, a U.S. person that owns at least 10 percent of the value or voting rights in one or more CFCs will be required to include its global intangible low-taxed income as currently taxable income, regardless of whether any amount is distributed to the shareholder. A U.S. person includes U.S. individuals, domestic corporations, partnerships, trusts and estates.

Per IRS news release 2018-186, the new reporting rules requires the filing of Form 8992. The Form would be helpful for U.S. Shareholder Calculation of Global Intangible Low-Taxed Income.

The new law applies to the first tax year of a CFC beginning after Dec. 31, 2017, and the U.S. shareholder’s year with or within which that year ends, and all subsequent tax years.

These proposed regulations do not include foreign tax credit computational rules relating to global intangible low-taxed income, which will be addressed separately in the future as the release further states.

CPA Global Tax team can help you navigate through to the maze of these complicated rules. Please email us for any assistance.

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Repatriation tax – IRS provides penalty reliefs to many

In recently published Newswire, IRS announced that it will grant penalty relief in certain cases with regard to repatriation tax under IRC 965.

In nutshell, following are the new three relief provisions:

In general, the questions and answers indicate that:
• In some instances, the IRS will waive the estimated tax penalty for taxpayers subject to the transition tax who improperly attempted to apply a 2017 calculated overpayment to their 2018 estimated tax, as long as they make all required estimated tax payments by June 15, 2018.
• For individual taxpayers who missed the April 18, 2018, deadline for making the first of the eight annual installment payments, the IRS will waive the late-payment penalty if the installment is paid in full by April 15, 2019. Absent this relief, a taxpayer’s remaining installments over the eight-year period would have become due immediately. This relief is only available if the individual’s total transition tax liability is less than $1 million. Interest will still be due. Later deadlines apply to certain individuals who live and work outside the U.S.
• Individuals who have already filed a 2017 return without electing to pay the transition tax in eight annual installments can still make the election by filing a 2017 Form 1040X with the IRS. The amended Form 1040 generally must be filed by Oct. 15, 2018.

IRS accordingly updated the FAQ page and added these reliefs.

Please contact CPA Global Tax (www.cpaglobaltax.com) team if you have any questions regarding repatriation tax as well as GILTI tax.