“Investment in US property” inclusion is not qualified dividend – Tax Court affirms

In Osvaldo Rodriguez et ux V. Commissioner, the fifth circuit recently upheld the decision in a transaction involving inclusion of IRC 956 income with respect to the taxpayers’ Controlled Foreign Corporation (CFC) in Mexico.

Osvaldo and Ana Rodriguez, husband and wife, were citizens of Mexico and permanent residents of the U.S. They were the sole shareholders of Editora Paso del Norte, S.A. de C.V. (Editora). Editora had been incorporated in 1976 under Mexican  law, and in 2001 it had established operations in the U.S. as a branch under the name Editora Paso del Norte, S.A. de C.V., Inc.—a controlled foreign corporation (CFC).  On their amended 2003 and original 2004 U.S. federal income tax returns, the taxpayers included in gross income $1,585,527 and $1,478,202, respectively, for amounts of Editora’s earnings invested in U.S. property and taxable directly under IRC 951(a)(1)(B) and IRC 956. 

Taxpayers treated the IRC 951 inclusions as qualified dividend income subject to preferential qualified dividend rates. IRS determined that the Code Sec.  951 inclusions were taxable at ordinary income rates.

The fifth circuit upheld the decision and ruled that the amounts included in the Rodriguez’s gross income under IRC 951(a)(1)(B) and IRC 956 with respect to their CFC’s investments in U.S. property were not qualified dividend  income under IRC 1(h)(11). 

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Taiwan agrees to FATCA with United States

Taiwan’s Financial Supervisory Commission (FSC) and the Ministry of Finance (MoF), jointly announced their intent to pursue an intergovernmental agreement to facilitate the implementation of the Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act (FATCA) – RIA News.

Taiwan has created an interagency task force, including the FSC, the MoF, the Ministry of Justice and the Ministry of Economic Affairs to study compliance options under FATCA. Previous consultations between the U.S. Treasury and Taiwan were focused on reducing compliance costs associated with FATCA. In addition, efforts have been dedicated to assisting local financial institutions to comply with all the domestic legal requirements and to protecting the depositors as well as the investors.

“The Taiwan authorities are supportive of the underlying goals of FATCA, and are interested in exploring a framework for mutual cooperation to facilitate the implementation of FATCA,” the statement said.
“Both sides affirm their willingness to continue their consultations and actively seek to finalize the signing of an agreement.

Tax tribunal in India rules database access fees as royalty – implications for US companies

In the case, the taxpayer (ONGC) was an Indian resident company engaged in the exploration and development of natural oil and gas. ONGC subscribed to an online database maintained by Wood MacKenzie (WM), a U.K. resident company. The subscription, which provided information on the global oil and gas industry, required ONGC to pay a fee to WM in exchange for a license agreement that provided for an exclusive and non-transferable right to access and download information from the site. No right to sublicense was granted to ONGC under the license agreement and the use of the information was limited to what was specified in the agreement. The website was only accessible by select ONGC employees and WM provided two days of training per year to 20 ONGC employees on technical issues related to oil and gas exploration.

The Indian Income tax Appellate Tribunal ruled that the fees paid by ONCG are properly characterized as royalties, for Indian tax purposes, under both Indian domestic law and the India-UK double taxation treaty. It was therefore subject to the applicable withholding tax according to the treaty.

Number of U.S. based companies provide the database subscriptions services to the users in India. They should closely study amd monitor the case as this may have deep implications for them.