Transition tax and S- Corporations, IRS provides additional details

IRS today provided additional information on how to comply with the transition tax payment when a triggering event occurs with S – Corporations (IR-2019-128). The updated FAQ explains when, how and where to file the Consent Agreements.

As per the provisions, S- Corporations are allowed to defer Section 965 transition tax liability after making the 965(i) election. Generally when the triggering event occurs (when S Corporation ceases to be an S Corporation, when a liquidation or sale of substantially all the assets occurs or when the shareholder of S- Corporation transfers the stock – whichever occurs first), the entire tax liability will be assessed on the shareholder’s tax return for that year. However, shareholder can make election under Section 965(h) and pay the tax liability in eight installments. Section 965(i)(4)(D) provides that the shareholder in such cases, must obtain consent of the Commissioner in order to pay in installments.

IRS explains in the updated FAQs that in such cases,

  • shareholder must file a Consent Agreement within 30 days of the occurrence of the triggering event.
  • IRS further clarifies that it is not possible for S Corporation to obtain the consent on behalf of the shareholders.
  • The Consent Agreement may be filed with IRS Memphis Compliance Service Collection Operations at the following address: Memphis CSCO, 5333 Getwell Road MS 81, Memphis, TN 38118
  • It is still required that the shareholders make Section 965(h) election on the tax return to pay the tax liability in eight installments.
  • Form 965-A and 965-B, whichever is applicable must be updated as well.
  • S-Corporation and the shareholders are jointly an severally liable to pay the triggered tax in installments.

FAQs have also been updated with some examples when there is an excess remittance of the transition tax.

 

 

 

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Repatriation tax – IRS provides penalty reliefs to many

In recently published Newswire, IRS announced that it will grant penalty relief in certain cases with regard to repatriation tax under IRC 965.

In nutshell, following are the new three relief provisions:

In general, the questions and answers indicate that:
• In some instances, the IRS will waive the estimated tax penalty for taxpayers subject to the transition tax who improperly attempted to apply a 2017 calculated overpayment to their 2018 estimated tax, as long as they make all required estimated tax payments by June 15, 2018.
• For individual taxpayers who missed the April 18, 2018, deadline for making the first of the eight annual installment payments, the IRS will waive the late-payment penalty if the installment is paid in full by April 15, 2019. Absent this relief, a taxpayer’s remaining installments over the eight-year period would have become due immediately. This relief is only available if the individual’s total transition tax liability is less than $1 million. Interest will still be due. Later deadlines apply to certain individuals who live and work outside the U.S.
• Individuals who have already filed a 2017 return without electing to pay the transition tax in eight annual installments can still make the election by filing a 2017 Form 1040X with the IRS. The amended Form 1040 generally must be filed by Oct. 15, 2018.

IRS accordingly updated the FAQ page and added these reliefs.

Please contact CPA Global Tax (www.cpaglobaltax.com) team if you have any questions regarding repatriation tax as well as GILTI tax.

 

IRS says inverted companies won’t be allowed to access foreign earnings without paying US tax

IRS announced that it intends to issue regulations under Code Sec. 304(b)(5)(B), Code Sec. 367 , Code Sec. 7701(l), and Code Sec. 7874 with respect to corporate inversion transactions.

Among others, the regulations will prevent inverted companies from accessing a foreign subsidiary’s earnings while deferring U.S. tax through the use of creative loans, which are known as “hopscotch” loans (under section 956(e) of the code).

In general, the forthcoming regulations will prevent inverted companies from using certain techniques to access the overseas earnings of the U.S. company’s foreign subsidiaries without being subject to US tax. This would close a loophole to prevent inverted companies from transferring cash or property from a controlled foreign corporation to a new parent to completely avoid U.S. tax, and make it more difficult for U.S. entities to invert.

Notice 2014-52 further added that regulations will generally apply to transactions completed on or after Sept. 22, 2014.