Repatriation tax – IRS provides penalty reliefs to many

In recently published Newswire, IRS announced that it will grant penalty relief in certain cases with regard to repatriation tax under IRC 965.

In nutshell, following are the new three relief provisions:

In general, the questions and answers indicate that:
• In some instances, the IRS will waive the estimated tax penalty for taxpayers subject to the transition tax who improperly attempted to apply a 2017 calculated overpayment to their 2018 estimated tax, as long as they make all required estimated tax payments by June 15, 2018.
• For individual taxpayers who missed the April 18, 2018, deadline for making the first of the eight annual installment payments, the IRS will waive the late-payment penalty if the installment is paid in full by April 15, 2019. Absent this relief, a taxpayer’s remaining installments over the eight-year period would have become due immediately. This relief is only available if the individual’s total transition tax liability is less than $1 million. Interest will still be due. Later deadlines apply to certain individuals who live and work outside the U.S.
• Individuals who have already filed a 2017 return without electing to pay the transition tax in eight annual installments can still make the election by filing a 2017 Form 1040X with the IRS. The amended Form 1040 generally must be filed by Oct. 15, 2018.

IRS accordingly updated the FAQ page and added these reliefs.

Please contact CPA Global Tax (www.cpaglobaltax.com) team if you have any questions regarding repatriation tax as well as GILTI tax.

 

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“One Person Company” concept introduced in India

Recently Companies Act 2013 was enacted in India. One of the concepts that was introduced for the first time is OPC or One Person Company concept. Practitioners of the erstwhile Companies Act of 1956 never could imagine that a Company can be formed just by one person! However, siding with the developed countries’ corporate laws, this certainly is a welcome change. It is remaining to be seen as to how the concept will be received by the business as well professional community in India.

The Companies (Incorporation) Rules, 2014 provides as following:

  • A natural person who is an Indian citizen and resident in India shall be eligible to incorporate an OPC and to become a nominee for the sole member of the OPC.
  • Corporations, foreigners or a non resident individual cannot incorporate an OPC;
  • A person cannot incorporate more than one OPC or become a nominee in more than one OPC. However, such a person can be a member of one OPC and nominee of another OPC;
  • Where a member of an OPC becomes a member of another OPC by virtue of his nomination in that second OPC, he shall opt out of either one of the OPC within a period of 180 days;
  • A minor cannot become a member or nominee of an OPC or hold shares with beneficial interest; An OPC cannot carry out NBFC activities including investment in securities of anybody corporate.
  • Every OPC will mention “One Person Company“ in brackets below the name of such company wherever it is printed, affixed or engraved. Hence, the name should be mentioned as “ABC  (One Person Company)“  and not any other way.

It is perceived that the new development will not be attractive from the Indian income tax point. Indian tax law imposes a secondary tax on dividend (called distribution tax) on the Companies. If OPC has to pay the dividend tax, it looses its attractiveness as compared to a sole proprietorship.

It will be interesting to watch the evolution of the concept and see if the law will accommodate foreign investors and allow them to use OPC in future.